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The Dead That Walk edited by Stephen Jones

Posted by travizzt on June 14, 2011

The dead are rising and the zombie apocalypse is here!

The Dead That Walk edited by Stephen Jones

The Dead That Walk was released November 2009 and published by Ulysses Press. There are twenty-four short stories written by Richard Matheson & Richard Christian Matheson, Yvonne Navarro, Michael Marshall Smith, Mark Samuels, Joe Hill, Weston Ochse, David J. Schow, Nancy Holder, H. P. Lovecraft, Ramsey Campbell, Lisa Morton, Brian Keene, Gary McMahon, Joe R. Lansdale, Kelly Dunn, Clive Barker, Christopher Fowler, Robert E. Howard, Stephen Woodworth, Harlan Ellison, Robert Shearman, Kim Newman, Scott Edelman, and Stephen King. Before each short story, there’s a brief biography of that story’s author as well as listing some of their previous works and experience with writing about zombies. The Dead That Walk focuses on zombie short stories.

“Introduction: Shoot ’em in the Brain” by Stephen Jones
This was an interesting look into how zombies and zombie culture has made its way into the mainstream, along with giving the history of zombies. This is just a neat history lesson and a great way to begin an anthology.

“Where There’s a Will” by Richard Matheson & Richard Christian Matheson
A man is buried alive and is seeking a way to free himself. However, what he learns makes him wish he were still buried.
Criticisms:
There isn’t anything that really detracts from this story.
Praises:
1) Claustrophobia. “Where There’s a Will” does a wonderful job at making the reader feel claustrophobic and trapped in a casket.
2) Twist. There is a twist at the end that is just fantastic and no words can really describe it without revealing what it is.
Overall: 5/5
Thoughts:
“Where There’s a Will” is a very short story done right. There is a real claustrophobic feeling to the story and what the main character is going through. Then you have the twist at the end, which was just fantastic.

“For the Good of All” by Yvonne Navarro
Father Stane arrives to the home of a woman named Fida, in hopes that those who live with Fida can be saved by faith and belief.
Criticisms:
There is nothing that detracts from this story.
Praises:
1) Dark. The tone of the story is very dark and works very well. It doesn’t become dark until the end, but after that point, you do realize that the whole story has this dark, bleak outlook.
2) Premise. The idea that the living dead can be ‘saved’ is an interesting concept. It’s played off so well in this story that you almost believe it can be done.
Overall: 5/5
Thoughts:
“For the Good of All” is a good story with a get premise. The dark tone is played off well enough that the story doesn’t feel dark until the end. After that point, the entire story really comes off as dark. Along with the interesting idea that the undead can be ‘saved’, this short story is wonderful.

“The Things He Said” by Michael Marshall Smith
A man living off a mountain tells of the advice his father gave him, along with his daily schedule.
Criticisms:
1) Slow. “The Things He Said” is a horribly slow story. This is mostly due to the details of what the main character does. It isn’t that interesting, even if that was the point. However, it still feels like nothing is going on.
Praises:
1) Simplicity. However, the simple nature of the story was nice. It wasn’t all that overblown and had a very direct way to tell it. It’s not that hard to get through because of this.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“The Things He Said” isn’t a bad story, but its way too slow. There are quite a few interesting and great moments, but in the long run it’s just a man telling us of his daily schedule. It’s simple, and that was good, but it felt like it needed more.

“The Last Resort” by Mark Samuels
After a zombie outbreak, Davies finds his rural home surrounded by the undead. Armed with only a shotgun, he has to survive, or use it as a last resort.
Criticisms:
1) Nothing New. “The Last Resort” doesn’t add anything all that new to the premise of zombies. In fact, it almost seems like something that has been done before, thousands of times.
2) Predictable. The other issue with being nothing ‘new’ added is that “The Last Resort” is terribly predictable. About a quarter of the way through the story, it becomes painfully obvious what is going to happen.
Praises:
1) Rural. The setting of the story is nice and has a different feel to it. Truthfully, “The Last Resort” reminds me of Night of the Living Dead in some respects.
Overall: 2/5
Thoughts:
“The Last Resort” isn’t a bad story, but it doesn’t add anything new. It’s predictable and you would get a feeling that you’ve seen this story before. Thankfully, the rural setting does give the story something unique about it and did remind me a bit of Night of the Living Dead.

“Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead” by Joe Hill
On the set of George Romero’s Dawn of the Dead, Bobby Conroy spots his former love in Harriet Rutherford, zombie make-up and all.
Criticisms:
1) Ending. The ending for “Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead” was something of a disappointment. It wasn’t bad, but it felt like everything was unresolved and a tad bit too sappy.
Praises:
1) Zombies. Having the characters acting like zombies in a movie was a very nice change. It gives this story something unique and different from the others.
2) Romantic Comedy. “Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead” was an interesting romantic comedy concept which feels like it should be longer. It was a funny and cute read that I didn’t expect from this kind of anthology.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“Bobby Conroy Comes Back from the Dead” was a unique and fun story. The ending felt kind of weak, but it still was a funny and cute short story that I wouldn’t have minded if it was longer.

“The Crossing of Aldo Ray” by Weston Ochse
Aldo Ray has to get into the United States to save his son and the only way to cross the Mexican-American border is to go across with los muertos, the undead. Things don’t go as planned.
Criticisms:
1) Flashbacks. There are quite a few flashbacks in “The Crossing of Aldo Ray” to help explain what Aldo is doing. They came off as really unimportant in the long run.
Praises:
1) Social Commentary. The story is an interesting take on illegal immigration. It was surprising to see something like this come up in a story about zombies and have it tie together so well.
2) Unexpected Events. There are a number of unexpected events that occur that are rather surprising.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“The Crossing of Aldo Ray” is an interesting take on illegal immigration, just with zombies. There are a few flashbacks that appear in the story that don’t really add anything that important to the plot. There are a few surprises that to pop up.

“Obsequy” by David J. Schow
Doug has to get out of Triple Pines. He has to leave the city. However, before he is able to, the dead come back, alive. After the love of his life returns from the beyond, can he leave?
Criticisms:
1) Character Development. The main issue with “Obsequy” is that you never really get to know the characters. Aside from Doug, everyone else is random. There were too many thrown in characters to help develop and give the reader an understanding of what is going on that you never get to actually like these characters.
Praises:
1) Zombies. “Obsequy” has an interesting and different take on zombies. Instead of the mumbling, stumbling undead, they are more akin to vampires in that they take something from their victims. They are living, breathing people who were dead.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“Obsequy” is a good story hampered by one problem; its characters. No one aside from the main character seems to be developed enough for the reader to really care about them. Even with the main character, I had a hard time getting into. It seems like the character development was second or third to explaining the story. Thankfully, “Obsequy” has an interesting take on zombies. In the story, they are living, non-brain eating beings who just happened to have been dead. In fact, they seemed more like vampires, feeding off the livings heat. It’s an interesting take.

“Zombonia” by Nancy Holder
Survivors of a zombie apocalypse find a refuge in the desert, but as the party goes on, it becomes clear that it’ll never end.
Criticisms:
1) Prose. “Zombonia” has this strange problem with its prose, it becomes annoying fast. The best way to explain how this story is told is if you take an air-headed valley girl who is stoned out of their mind. It gets annoying.
Praises:
1) Length. Thankfully, “Zombonia” is incredibly short. It’s a quick read with it being barely four pages.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“Zombonia” may leave you annoyed by the prose. It’s annoying and headache inducing, if you don’t like that “valley-girl” accent. Thankfully, at barely four pages long, it’s a quick enough read that you almost overlook it.

“Cool Air” by H. P. Lovecraft
A New York writer finds a new place to live. After finding the place and learning of the other tenants, a heart attack seizes him. Thankfully, one of the tenants is a doctor and the writer goes to him for aid. However, there isn’t something quite right about the doctor.
Criticisms:
Nothing really affects the story’s enjoyment.
Praises:
1) Build-up. “Cool Air” was built up wonderfully. You, like the writer, wonder what is odd about this doctor, almost to the point of being terrified by him. There was a distinct sense of dread and fear at play that really came off well.
2) Pay off. The pay off to all that build-up is wonderful. You never really learn what happens, but at the same time you just know. There is a lot left to your imagination and that causes it to be even more terrifying.
Overall: 5/5
Thoughts:
“Cool Air” is a wonderfully suspenseful and terrifying story. The build-up and the pay off were just fantastic. There was a distinct sense of the unknown and of dread that really came off well.

“Call First” by Ramsey Campbell
An older man continues to use a phone in the library. Same time, everyday. The librarian at the desk finds this particular activity odd and goes off to find out who he is calling, but learns that it may have been best to not investigate.
Criticisms:
1) Beginning. The beginning of “Call First” felt unnatural and forced. We really never learn why the main character is so annoyed with the older man using his phone and the whole premise of the story is built on this. It just felt like it was forced.
Praises:
1) Ending. The ending for “Call First” was wonderful. It was full of suspense and the reveal was just great.
2) Suspense. “Call First” was full of suspense. You didn’t know what was going to happen and it just keeps building and building until the payoff.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“Call First” is a very suspenseful story. The beginning did come off as slightly confusing because you don’t understand his reasoning why he becomes so obsessed with finding out who the older man is talking to. It just felt forced. However, the ending and the build up in suspense was just great.

“Joe and Abel in the Field of Rest” by Lisa Morton
Joe lives alone in a farmhouse that him and his father owned. A year after his father’s death, Joe has been alone. Thankfully, his loneliness is saved by an unlikely source.
Criticisms:
1) Father. The relationship that Joe has with his father felt unnecessary. It didn’t really feel that important.
Praises:
1) Simple. The story is rather simple and it works out for the best. It allows the reader to instantly get into the story and enjoy.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“Joe and Abel in the Field of Rest” is a good story that could have been something more. The only problem is with the mentions of Joe’s father, which never seemed to amount to anything. The story is simple enough to allow you to get into it quickly and is just as enjoyable.

“Midnight at the Body Farm” by Brian Keene
Hector Bolivar isn’t alone with the dead bodies in the body farm.
Criticisms:
1) Continuity. “Midnight at the Body Farm” ties into a novel by Brian Keene called Dead Sea. It doesn’t seem to really come up in the story, but it does seem that the reader is missing something.
Praises:
1) Simple. “Midnight at the Body Farm” is a very, very short, simple story. It’s quick and to the point.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“Midnight at the Body Farm” is a short, but good story. The shortness of it does make it feel quick, but it’s still fun and exciting. There is a slight feeling of continuity concerning this short story and Brian Keene’s novel titled Dead Sea, but it’s only slight. All in all, this short story is very quick and to the point, but could have been slightly longer.

“Dead to the World” by Gary McMahon
A man and his wife are surviving in a zombie ravaged England, but one can’t escape their past and the other just needs to survive.
Criticisms:
1) Cold. “Dead to the World” is a cold, distant story. The story just felt sterile and cold, almost lifeless. This is due mostly to the main character’s narration.
Praises:
1) Relationship. The spin to the relationship between the two characters was interesting and unexpected. It was shocking and depressing, but real to the situation. It was just different in all the right ways.
2) Ending. The ending to “Dead to the World” is really shocking, yet satisfying. I could say more, but it’s just too good to give up.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“Dead to the World” is a cold, distant, but good story. The story really felt depressing and almost lifeless, but it still worked. The relationship between the two main characters was something different and unexpected. The ending was just satisfying and different, which is the best way to sum up this story.

“The Long Dead Day” by Joe R. Lansdale
A family is living in a walled off homestead in a zombie infested world, but tragedy strikes as the daughter is bitten by a “dog”.
Criticisms:
1) Short. “The Long Dead Day” is very short, almost to the point of being too short. There is no room for character development and it’s hard to get behind them.
Praises:
1) Tragic. “The Long Dead Day” is a tragic story. It is a little sad to see what happens, but at the same time, you know it has to.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“The Long Dead Day” is an average story due to its short length. There was no room for character development and the characters relationships really seemed to be direct and to the point. However, the story does play tragedy well.

“A Call to Temple” by Kelly Dunn
A mother tries to live with an infected son, unwilling to end his life.
Criticisms:
1) Ending. The ending of “A Call to Temple” was a bad way to end a story, but it was almost too predictable and silly. It didn’t really feel all that poignant like it was meant to.
Praises:
1) Relationship. The relationship between Hannah and her son, Sam, was touching and sad. You really could tell that she didn’t want to give up on her son.
2) Setting. “A Call to Temple” is set in a non-apocalyptic zombie world and it felt different and unique. There still were zombies roaming around, but it felt more subdued. Because of this, the times when zombies do come up, it feels more shocking.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“A Call to Temple” is a fairly good story. The ending was weak and didn’t have the poignancy that it was trying for. The relationship between Hannah and Sam really did feel like a mother and son relationship. You can see Hannah going to the lengths she goes through for her son. Also, the non-apocalyptic, subtle zombie infested world felt different and unique. This give the zombie attacks feel more shocking and disturbing.

“Haeckel’s Tale” by Clive Barker
A group of friends are exchanging stories and gossip when one brings up a past experience with a necromancer.
Criticisms:
There is nothing that hampers this story.
Praises:
1) Twisted. “Haeckel’s Tale” is as twisted and deranged as a zombie story can get. I won’t go into detail, but if your into sick things, you’ll love this.
2) Atmosphere. “Haeckel’s Tale” is surprisingly atmospheric. It really adds to the twisted and deranged nature of the story.
Overall: 5/5
Thoughts:
“Haeckel’s Tale” is a twisted story. The atmosphere really does help with the twisted and deranged feeling. This is one story that I won’t be forgetting anytime soon.

“The Rulebook” by Christopher Fowler
Young Paul spread a rumor about his neighbor, Mr. Hill, killing his wife. But when Paul and his mother are offered to stay at his home due to a leaky roof and Mr. Hill going to the hospital for minor surgery, Paul discovers that you shouldn’t tell rumors.
Criticisms:
There is nothing that takes away from this story’s enjoyment.
Praises:
1) Lighter. “The Rulebook” is the lightest story in this collection. It’s not terrible dark and morbid, and because of that, it stands out more. It’s still a creepy story, but it works without going to far into darker territory.
2) View. “The Rulebook” is told through the eyes of a young kid and it worked very well. There were some scenes at the end that I thought really were something that I child could imagine and think up.
Overall: 5/5
Thoughts:
“The Rulebook” really stands out in this anthology. Not only was it entertaining, but it had a very different feel to it. It was a lot lighter and not as depressing as the rest of the stories, thus far. Also the viewpoint of what a young child would see and image was written very believably.

“Black Canaan” by Robert E. Howard
In the swamps of Louisiana in the early Twentieth Century, an uprising is about to occur led by voodoo magic and it’s up to Kirby Buckner to stop it. However, he is put under a spell by a voodoo witch and is slowly pulled towards his death.
Criticisms:
1) Content. Is may be a problem for some readers, but do to the time that “Black Canaan” was written, it may come across as slightly racist. However, if you take into consideration that the story was written in 1936, it may just lessen the impact of some words used.
2) Side Characters. The side characters in “Black Canaan” were there for almost one reason; to die. If you really look at all the other names mentioned, aside from Kirby and the brown girl, almost all of them die, except for, maybe, two people. They just didn’t really make that much of an impact and should have been developed a little more.
Praises:
1) Voodoo. The use of voodoo zombies really made this story feel different. They aren’t the mumbling, stumbling undead in the previous stories, but something new and on a different level of terror. It does seem like the voodoo zombies are mostly forgotten in recent times, and it’s nice to see that’s not the case.
2) Suspense. “Black Canaan” is full of suspense. There were times when you didn’t know what was going to happen. For example, the “spell” that Kirby is under. You really never knew what was going to happen and that just kept building and building.
Overall: 3/5
Thoughts:
“Black Canaan” is a different, good story that may turn off some readers due to certain words. It may seem racist, but it never felt racist and if you take into consideration that it was written in 1936, it’s more understandable. However, the side characters really take away from the overall experience. It just felt like they were there just to die and had almost no development that it caused me not to really care about them. Thankfully, the voodoo aspect of the story is fantastic. It seems like the voodoo zombie is forgotten now-a-days and it’s great to see a story bringing them up. It made the story feel different and unique. Also, the building suspense is wonderful. You really don’t know what is going to happen to Kirby until the last few pages.

“The Silent Majority” by Stephen Woodworth
Richard Nixon returns from the dead to prevent the Apocalypse of the undead kind.
Criticisms:
1) Politics. I am not a fan of politics and political minded storytelling. I don’t mind if it’s hidden in the narrative, but I don’t like blatant political meaning and party politics in the stories I read. So if you do like that kind of thing, you’ll probably enjoy it. But for me, I couldn’t stand it.
2) Cheesy. For some reason, “The Silent Majority” came off as embarrassingly cheesy. It was hard to get into because of how outrageous and silly the story was at times. It would have been fine if it had a ‘campy’ feeling to the story, but it didn’t.
Praises:
1) Idea. “The Silent Majority” did have an interesting idea of having a zombie return to warn the living.
Overall: 1/5
Thoughts:
“The Silent Majority” is not the kind of story I like. While the idea, having a zombie return to deliver a warning, was interesting, everything else I didn’t enjoy. the story had this cheesy, odd feeling throughout. It wasn’t the ‘campy’ kind of cheesy, but something more annoying. It was hard to take this story seriously. This is a political based story and I honestly dislike stories that rely on it. I’m just not a political person and I like having politics generally ignored in stories. However, if you like party politics or Richard Nixon, then it could be enjoyable.

“Sensible City” by Harlan Ellison
A corrupt police lieutenant named Gropp and his deputy are going to be sentenced to death, but escape the trial only to find themselves lost on the run.
Criticisms:
1) Prose. “Sensible City” is written in a way that is finicky and jumpy. It does detract from the enjoyment when you don’t know what exactly is happening.
Praises:
1) Sensibility. It is nice to finally have a sensible character. It’s a different feel to how the story plays out, but it’s nice to see someone using their brains.
2) Ending. The ending for “Sensible City” is just creepy. You never expected anything like that to happen and when it does, you still at a loss.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“Sensible City” is a good and different kind of story. It may seem a little finicky and jumpy while reading, but that’s the only issue with the story. Everything else is just great. It was wonderful to have a main character that actually uses their brains and common sense, which just makes the ending all the better.

“Granny’s Grinning” by Robert Shearman
The hot, new Christmas gift for children allows them to become movie monsters. But after Sarah’s grandfather passes away, her family is going to make this Christmas ‘special’ for her grandmother.
Criticisms:
1) Exposition. The main problem with “Granny’s Grinning” is that it’s hard to figure out what is going on due to the way the story is told. There isn’t anything explaining that these “Zombies”, “Werewolves”, and “Vampires” are costumes that changes its wearer in these creatures. Without that crucial tidbit, it’s hard to understand the story.
Praises:
1) Costumes. The idea behind the costume was a very unique and different one. It’s an interesting idea and it’s very easy to see this premise further explored.
2) Ending. The ending of “Granny’s Grinning” is as morbid and disturbing as possible, but in the most odd and unusual way. It’s hard to believe that the story ends like them after just starting and it seems to really add ‘shock value’ to it.
Overall: 4/5
Thoughts:
“Granny’s Grinning” is a morbid and disturbing story that won’t leave my mind for a while. Aside from the crucial missing piece of exposition about how the costumes work, the rest of the story is memorable and shocking. The idea that the costumes can do this is interesting and it’s very easy to see this being further explored. Then you have an ending that you would never expect that just leaves you disturbed by strangely satisfied.

“Amerikanski Dead at the Moscow Morgue or: Children of Marx and Coca Cola” by Kim Newman
A soldier turned experiment helper, Chirkov, is assigned to the Spa, a place where American tourists turned zombies are dissected and looked at. But there’s something else going on in the Spa.
Criticisms:
1) Unfocused. The main problem with “Amerikanski Dead” is that the story doesn’t seem to stay focused for longer than a few sentences. It’s almost like this should have been a longer story, but was cut-down to fit as a short twenty page story. This causes the sentences to have a jumping effect of not staying on topic for too long.
2) Ending. The ending really felt silly. It didn’t match up to the tone of the story and came off as sudden or not well thought out.
Praises:
1) Tulbeyev. Tulbeyev is one of the minor characters and the only one to have any real personality. He was the comic relief and he worked very well. He does have some brash actions, but they do fit with the character. He’s really the only memorable character because of his brash actions.
Overall: 2/5
Thoughts:
“Amerikanski Dead” has a lot of things common with its long title, long-winded and makes little sense. The story is unfocused and confusing. The sentences have this “jumping effect” where it jumps off topic rapidly. It almost felt like this should have been a longer story, but was condensed down. The ending also came off as sudden and silly. It didn’t fit with anything else in the story and just felt jammed in. But at least one character did make this story enjoyable for his brash actions and humor, Tulbeyev. This is just an unfocused mess of a story.

“Tell Me Like You Done Before” by Scott Edelman
After killing his best friend, Lenny, George is horrified to see that Lenny is still alive and tries to run from his best friend. After understanding that he’ll never escape, George knows he must confront his undead friend.
Criticisms:
Nothing takes away from this story’s enjoyment.
Praises:
1) Of Mice and Men. “Tell Me Like You Done Before” continues where John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men leaves off and it surprisingly fits together very well. It’s an interesting way to go about writing a zombie story, but it just works and makes the original all the more entertaining.
2) Ending. The ending of “Tell Me Like You Done Before” is sick and twisted, but in the best way possible. It echoes the ending of Of Mice and Men, but gives it a disturbing and horrifying twist.
Overall: 5/5
Thoughts:
“Tell Me Like You Done Before” is Of Mice and Men and Zombies, and it’s wonderful. The story really adds to the original in ways that just surprised me. The ending really echoes the original, but gives it a disturbing and twisted ending that just fits. I didn’t expect it to have anything to do with John Steinbeck’s novel, but after reading it, I am glad it did.

“Home Delivery” by Stephen King
A newly wed and pregnant woman named Maddie just lost her husband due to a lobster fishing accident. Alone and pregnant may be a scary thing, but it becomes even more terrifying when the dead come back.
Criticisms:
1) Boring. “Home Delivery” isn’t that interesting of a story and really leaves a lot to be desired. It seemed like nothing important was happening, aside from who is who.
2) Ending. The ending ends on a cliffhanger, and it leaves a lot unspoken and unfinished. It just ends with little resolution and little meaning. Just ends.
Praises:
1) Transmission. “Home Delivery” did have a brilliant and creepy scene dealing with a transmission. It was fantastically written and gives it this haunting, desperate tone.
Overall: 2/5
Thoughts:
“Home Delivery” didn’t really deliver and was one of the more boring, unexciting stories in the anthology. It seemed like nothing went on and the only thing that was really reinforced was who this person was and what they did. The ending was a cliffhanger and didn’t really finish the story. Nothing was really resolved and it feels like there should have been more. There was a genuinely creepy moment concerning a transmission that did give the story a slightly creepy feel, but it didn’t hold true for the rest of the story.

OVERALL AVERAGED ANTHOLOGY RATING: 4/5
Final Thoughts:
The Dead That Walk is a good anthology that gives you a lot of different takes on zombies. There really is something for everyone, zombie fan and zombie hater alike. If there is one disappointing thing about The Dead That Walk is that there is just too many stories and you can become easily distracted. But do to the amount of stories, it really does give you a vast amount of authors to check out. IF you’re a zombie fan or just like good horror stories, this is definitely worth a pick up.

Stories Worth Reading:
1) “Where There’s a Will” by Richard Matheson & Richard Christian Matheson
2) “For the Good of All” by Yvonne Navarro
3) “Cool Air” by H. P. Lovecraft
4) “Haeckel’s Tale” by Clive Barker
5) “The Rulebook” by Christopher Fowler
6) “Tell Me Like You Done Before” by Scott Edelman

Stories to Avoid
1) “The Silent Majority” by Stephen Woodworth

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